FLORIDA VINTAGE RACEBOAT CLUB

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Vintage Boat Classes

Hydroplanes

Hydroplanes, no matter what size, have one thing in common. When underway they touch the water at three points; the very aft end of the port and starboard sponsons, which all hydroplanes have, and the propeller area. The very first hydroplane was designed and patented by Adolph Apel in 1936. Early hydroplanes had a “shovel nose” or rounded bow.
Read more.

Jersey Skiff

The Jersey Speed Skiff is built to very strict specifications. It is 16 feet long with a perfectly flat bottom. Engines are restricted to Chevy small blocks (283 or 305 cubic inches) with no modifications. Skiffs run at about 80-90 miles per hour.
Skiffs seat a driver and rider at the aft end. Steering is a wheel on a vertical post. Engine is mounted mid-ships. JS hull number.
Read more.

Welcome Vintage Raceboat Fans!

Roger Hinsdale – Miss Windy and Tom Bertolini – Advanced United – having finished their heats at the 2010 Wheeling regatta. The Wheeling V&H event is held annually over Labor Day weekend.

FVRC News & Stories

Keep up to date on the Florida Vintage Raceboat Club

GRAND PRIX: IN THE BEGINNING

By Fred Farley

Grand Prix Class hydroplane racing has long been considered the epitome of automotive-powered inboard racing.

The sight and sound of these magnificent boats with their souped-up V-8 engines at full song is an experience like no other in motor sports.

Grand Prix boats began making their presence felt on the Canadian Boating Federation (CBF) circuit in the 1960s. Read more.

In the Seat of a Vintage “Flyby”

An owner/driver of a vintage raceboat brings three things to the Regatta; a well restored, properly functioning Vintage Raceboat, documentation of the boat’s restoration and history, and an in-water demonstration of this restored piece of history known as ‘The Flyby”. The Flyby is an opportunity for the owner/driver to put his or her driving and operating skills to the test. Putting aside all the hours of research, craftsmanship, and mechanicals, this is where drivers have to recall or learn skills that are practiced by very few. Read more.

Safety

Please Direct Your Attention to the Safety Boats on the Course

We’d like you to notice something about the course when the raceboats are running. You will see two safety boats with several people in them moving around the infield of the course. They are the APBA Rescue Team and unsung heroes of this Regatta. Without them the raceboats would not be able to leave the docks, literally. APBA rules do not allow raceboats to run without a rescue team present, which includes skilled divers, drivers, and emergency medical responders. Read more.

Questions?

Do you have questions about the club? Drop us a note at the form below, or join up right here.

Frequently Asked Questions

Learn more about raceboats.

WHAT THE “H” DOES THAT MEAN?

Have you been wondering why the hydroplanes carry a letter AND a number with their names? What a good question! The owner of the boat chooses the number that the boat carries. The APBA uses letter prefixes to differentiate between each class of hydroplanes. Each class has its own specific rules mostly with regard to the length of the boat, size of the engine, and whether the engine may be modified or is required to be stock. These rules often changed with the development of new engines, so the letter classifications did not always designate the same size of boat through the years. Read more.

Is FVRC sanctioned?

The FVRC is a Club associated with the American Power Boat Association (APBA). The APBA Clubs are scattered across the US and are responsible to host the racing events that are sanctioned (insured) by the APBA. More information is available on the APBA Website. Each Club can declare what categories of APBA racing they support, and the FVRC will be a V&H Club.

How can I become a member?

Membership shall consist of a regular membership (member) who may, or may not, be a participant. The membership also includes the member’s spouse, as a non-participant & non-voting. In this context, “participant” is a member who participates in any V&H in-water events. If the husband and wife are both participants and/or want to vote on Club matters, they must each purchase a regular membership to vote and to participate in V&H in-water events.

The dues amount will be set by the Board of Directors. The dues amount, or change in amount, will be announced at the Annual Membership Meeting and will take effect at the beginning of the next fiscal year. If new and/or renewing Memberships are processed three or less months prior to the start of the new fiscal year, the Memberships will be considered as members in good standing through the current and following fiscal year. Dues must have been paid for a member to be in good standing.

Read more.

What are those flags about?
FLAGS USED AT VINTAGE RACEBOAT EVENTS

During the exhibition runs by the vintage raceboats, you will notice that colored flags are displayed on some of the safety boats and also from the dock area. The flags you will see may be green, yellow or yellow/green, black or red. Read more.

How is safety addressed at the regattas?
Please Direct Your Attention to the Safety Boats on the Course

We’d like you to notice something about the course when the raceboats are running. You will see two safety boats with several people in them moving around the infield of the course. They are the APBA Rescue Team and unsung heroes of this Regatta. Without them the raceboats would not be able to leave the docks, literally. APBA rules do not allow raceboats to run without a rescue team present, which includes skilled divers, drivers, and emergency medical responders.

Read more.

What are the club bylaws?

The club bylaws for the Florida Vintage Raceboat Club can be found here. A printable version can be found here.

Get Revved Up!

Email Address

info@fvrc.club

Write Us

PO Box 60458
Palm Bay, FL
32906-0458